Questions and More Questions

I probably shouldn’t use “meltdown” for how I’m feeling, right now, and all too often, but that really is how it feels when my brain can’t cope with the invisibility of things that are perfectly visible (and obvious) to me. The thing is that I do see things that most people overlook. A lot of that is a form of pattern recognition, and it can take a lot of strange forms that send me off chasing for more information.

I don’t intend to get into politics, but here’s an example from yesterday’s news. I imagine everyone who follows the staggering path of our new “president” is aware that on Saturday, he held a love-in for himself in Florida. And during his speech he talked about the terror attack in Sweden that was apparently going on even as he spoke. Of course the lie hit the news and the internet immediately.

Whoah! Hold on there, folks. Here’s what he actually said:

“When you look at what’s happening in Germany, when you look at what’s happening last night in Sweden — Sweden! Who would believe this? Sweden!”

“They took in large numbers, they’re having problems like they never like they never thought possible,”

Do you see “terror attack” anywhere. I don’t. He merely implied it, and everyone fell for it. As I’m sure he knew they would. I’ve seen any number of posts, articles, tweets, etc., talking about the Swedish terror attack lie, but I haven’t seen one single bit of evidence that anyone realized that’s not what he said. Am I being nitpicky? Not if you can understand that it’s an example of how easily people can be led to believe in something that didn’t happen. I guarantee that anyone you ask will remember Trump saying there was a terror attack going on in Sweden.

So that’s the kind of thing that constantly gets stuck in my craw and gives me mental meltdowns.

Here’s another, much more relevant to anyone on the spectrum. It isn’t something I was looking for; the bits and pieces just accumulated until they formed a pattern and a question. So — why is it that when I Google “autism comorbidities” all I get is information about medical and psychiatric disorders? Because what I’ve noticed over the years is that a lot of the problems people on the spectrum are dealing with are very different. A few years back when I was immersed in my autism learning curve, traits like face blindness, poor executive functioning, auditory and other sensitivities weren’t included in any list of comorbidities.

As far as I’ve been able to discover, they still aren’t. What do they have in common? They’re all pretty much invisible, and problems with them are easily attributed to other causes. Hmm. Could this possibly have anything to do with why, of all people on the spectrum, aspies are the least visible? Why they struggle with mild to severe disabilities that are never diagnosed as part of their aspieness? Why they are so easily brushed off as attention-seeking or just plain fakes?

You gotta wonder. I’d love to know if anyone with an “official” diagnosis was asked about those invisibles. Prove me wrong, or let’s explore it further.

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